Herbal Simples - Plants That Heal

Healing Flowers, Healing Herbs, Healing Fruit and Healing Trees - Enjoy The Healing Power Of Herbal Simples
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Welcome to Herbal Simples - Plants That Heal

William Thomas Fernie MD_

William Thomas Fernie MD_

William Thomas Fernie MD was a physician in the late 19th and early 20th century and very little is known about him and his life that is easily discoverable.

However, he left behind a lifetime's fascination and love with exploring not just the world of all things hard, but taking a greater view - comparing his knowledge with that what has been told over the ages, collecting ideas and trying to find connections between people, plants, animals and minerals.

Posted Jun 10, 2010 2,233 Reads More ...

What Are Herbal Simples?

What Are Herbal Simples?

It may happen that one or another enquirer taking up this study will ask, to begin with, "What is a Herbal Simple?"

The English word "Simple," composed of two Latin words, Singula plica (a single fold), means "Singleness," whether of material or purpose.

From primitive times the term "Herbal Simple" has been applied to any homely curative remedy consisting of one ingredient only, and that of a vegetable nature.

Many such a native medicine found favour and success with our single-minded forefathers, this being the "reverent simplicity of ancienter times."

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,234 Reads More ...

Acorn & Oak

Acorn & Oak

This is the well-known fruit of our British Oak, to Which tree it gives the name—Aik, or Eik, Oak.

The Acorn was esteemed by Dioscorides, and other old authors, for its supposed medicinal virtues.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 3,124 Reads More ...

Agrimony

Agrimony

The Agrimony is a herbal simple well known to all country folk, and abundant throughout England in the fields and woods, as a popular domestic medicinal herb.

Agrimony belongs to the Rose order of plants, and blossoms from June to September with small yellow flowers, which sit close along slender spikes a foot high, smelling like apricots, and called by the rustics "Church Steeples."

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,085 Reads More ...

Anemone

Anemone

The Wood Anemone, or medicinal English Pulsatilla, with its lovely pink white petals, and drooping blossoms, is one of our best known and most beautiful spring flowers. Herbalists do not distinguish it virtually from the silky-haired Anemone Pulsatilla, which medicinal variety is of highly valuable modern curative use as a Herbal Simple. The active chemical principles of each plant are "anemonin" and "anemonic acid."

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,832 Reads More ...

Angelica

Angelica

The wild Angelica grows commonly throughout England in wet places as an umbelliferous plant, with a tall hollow stem, out of which boys like to make pipes. It is purple, furrowed, and downy, bearing white flowers tinged with pink. But the herb is not useful as a herbal simple until cultivated in our gardens, the larger variety being chosen for this purpose, and bearing the name Angelica Archangelica.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,266 Reads More ...

Aniseed

Aniseed

The Anise Pimpinella, from "bipenella," because of its secondary, feather-like leaflets, belongs to the umbelliferous plants, and is cultivated in our gardens; but its aromatic seeds chiefly come from Germany. The careful housewife will do well always to have a supply of this most useful herbal simple closely bottled in her store cupboard.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,255 Reads More ...

Apple

Apple

Old Scandinavian traditions represent the Apple as the food of the gods, who, when they felt themselves growing feeble and infirm, resorted to this fruit for renewing their powers of mind and body

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,972 Reads More ...

Arum

Arum

The "lords and ladies" (arum maculatum) so well known to every rustic as common throughout Spring in almost every hedge row, has acquired its name from the colour of its erect pointed spike enclosed within the curled hood of an upright arrow-shaped leaf.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,992 Reads More ...

Asparagus

Asparagus

"Liebig, or some other scientist maintains that asparagin—the alkaloid in asparagus-develops form in the human brain: so, if you get hold of an artistic child, and give him plenty of asparagus, he will grow into a second Raffaelle!"

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,813 Reads More ...

Balm

Balm

"Balm," adds John Evelyn, "is sovereign for the brain, strengthening the memory, and powerfully chasing away melancholy." In France, women bruise the young shoots of balm, and make them into cakes, with eggs, sugar, and rose water, which they give to mothers in childbed as a strengthener.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,951 Reads More ...

Barberry

Barberry

The Common Barberry (Berberis), which gives its name to a special order of plants, grows wild as a shrub in our English copses and hedges, particularly about Essex, being so called from Berberin, a pearl oyster, because the leaves are glossy like the inside of an oyster shell.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,248 Reads More ...

Barley

Barley

Hordeum Vulgare—common Barley—is chiefly used in Great Britain for brewing and distilling; but, it has dietetic and medicinal virtues which entitle it to be considered among serviceable herbal simples.

Roman gladiators who depended for their strength and prowess chiefly on Barley, were called Hordearii.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,952 Reads More ...

Basil

Basil

The herb Sweet Basil (Ocymum Basilicum) is so called because "the smell thereof is fit for a king's house." It grows commonly in our kitchen gardens, but in England it dies down every year, and the seeds have to be sown annually. Botanically, it is named "basilicon," or royal, probably because used of old in some regal unguent, or bath, or medicine.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,959 Reads More ...

Bennet Herb

Bennet Herb

The Bennet Herb, the Herba Benedicta, or Blessed Herb, or Avens (Geum Urbanum) is a very common plant of the Rose tribe, in our woods, hedges, and shady places.

It has an erect hairy stem, red at the base, with terminal bright yellow drooping flowers. The ordinary name Avens—or Avance, Anancia, Enancia—signifies an antidote, because it was formerly thought to ward off the Devil, and evil spirits, and venomous beasts.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,451 Reads More ...

Betony

Betony

Few, if any, herbal plants have been more praised for their supposed curative virtues than the Wood Betony (Stachys Betonica), belonging to the order of Labiates. By the common people it is often called Bitny. The nameBetonica is from the Celtic "ben," head, and "tonic," good, in allusion to the usefulness of the herb against infirmities of the head.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 1,795 Reads More ...

Bilberry

Bilberry

This fruit, which belongs to the Cranberry order of plants, grows abundantly throughout England in heathy and mountainous districts.

The small-branched shrub bears globular, wax-like flowers, and black berries, which are covered, when quite fresh, with a grey bloom.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,211 Reads More ...

Blackberry

Blackberry

Blackberry is the well-known fruit of the Common Bramble (Rubus fructicosus), which grows in every English hedgerow, and which belongs to the Rose order of plants.

It has long been esteemed for its bark and leaves as a capital astringent, these containing much tannin; also for its fruit, which is supplied with malic and citric acids, pectin, and albumen.

Posted Jun 12, 2010 2,816 Reads More ...

Bluebell

Bluebell

The bluebell—the Agraphis mutans,—of the Lily tribe—is so abundant in English woods and pastures, whilst so widely known, and popular with young and old, as to need no description.

Posted Jun 13, 2010 3,119 Reads More ...

Buckbean

Buckbean

The Buckbean, or Bogbean or Marsh Trefoil, which is common enough in stagnant pools, and on our spongy bogs, is the most serviceable of all known herbal tonics.

The Buckbean may be easily recognised growing in water by its large leaves overtopping the surface, each being composed of three leaflets, and resembling the leaf of a Windsor Broad Bean.

Posted Jun 13, 2010 5,592 Reads More ...
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This is an excerpt from Herbal Simples by William Thomas Fernie, 1897

Reposted For Interest, Entertainment & Research Only.

Please seek advice from a modern herbalist before using medicinal herbs.